Follow Us:

Bleeding During Pregnancy

Home Bleeding During Pregnancy

Introduction

Vaginal bleeding during pregnancy can be scary. However, in most cases, it is not an indication of pregnancy-related problems. Slight bleeding during the first trimester (first three months of pregnancy) is quite normal. Many women who experience this deliver healthy babies.

Request an Appointment at Smiles

What does Bleeding during Pregnancy Indicate?

Bleeding during pregnancy is relatively common. Many women experience slight bleeding in their first trimester. Usually, it is not a reason to panic. However, bleeding during any point of the pregnancy could mean something serious. It is recommended you consult with your doctor or midwife to rule out any risk of complications.

Bleeding During Different Trimesters of Pregnancy

You can experience some amount of bleeding during different trimesters of pregnancy. It may not be a cause for concern. However, it is recommended you visit a doctor to avoid complications in the future and rule out any risk for your baby’s and your health.

Bleeding in the First Trimester

Approximately 20 percent of women experience bleeding in their first semester. The possible causes include:

  • ● Miscarriage: As miscarriage is more common during the first trimester of pregnancy, it could be one of the concerns with bleeding during pregnancy. However, bleeding during the first trimester may not necessarily indicate a miscarriage. If the ultrasound shows a heartbeat, there are high chances that the bleeding may not be due to a miscarriage.

Other symptoms of a miscarriage include tissue passing through the vagina and severe cramps in the lower abdomen.

  • ● Implantation bleeding: As the fetus implants itself in the uterine lining, you may experience slight spotting. Some women may experience bleeding even before they discover they are pregnant. Usually, the implantation bleeding during pregnancy is very light and lasts anywhere from a few hours to a few days.
  • ● Ectopic pregnancy: An ectopic pregnancy occurs when the fetus implants itself outside of the uterus, such as the fallopian tube. If the fetus keeps growing in the fallopian tube, it can burst, causing severe bleeding. Even though an ectopic pregnancy is dangerous, it occurs in only about 2 percent of all pregnancies.

Other symptoms of an ectopic pregnancy include lightheadedness and severe pain in the lower abdomen.

  • ● Molar pregnancy: Also known as a gestational trophoblastic disease, molar pregnancy occurs when abnormal tissue grows inside the uterus instead of a fetus. It is a rare condition, and often the abnormal tissue turns out to be cancerous. The cancerous tissue cells may also spread to other parts of the body.

Other symptoms of a molar pregnancy include rapid enlargement of the uterus and severe vomiting and nausea.

Bleeding During the Second and Third Trimesters

If you experience abnormal bleeding in your second or third trimesters, it could indicate serious problems. Call your doctor or midwife immediately in such cases.

The possible causes of bleeding in the second or third trimesters include:

  • ● Placental abruption: This occurs when the placenta detaches itself from the uterus during or before labor. It can lead to the collection of blood between the uterus and the placenta. Although placental abruption is risky, it occurs in about 1 percent of pregnancies.

Other symptoms that indicate placental abruption include back pain, tender uterus, blood clots in the vagina, and severe abdominal pain.

  • ● Placenta previa: You develop placenta previa when the placenta is situated lower in the uterus. It can partially or entirely cover the opening of the birth canal. However, it is rare in the third trimester and occurs in one out of 200 pregnancies.
  • ● Vasa Previa: A rare condition, vasa previa, occurs when your baby’s blood vessels cross the opening of the birth canal. It can be fatal to the baby as the blood vessels can tear open in the uterus, leading to severe bleeding and low oxygen levels. Other symptoms of vasa previa are excessive uterine bleeding and abnormal fetal heart rate.
  • Premature labor: If you experience abnormal vaginal bleeding in your third trimester, it could indicate premature labor. The mucus plug covering the vaginal opening may pass out of the vagina a few days or weeks before the preterm labor. You may also see a small amount of blood with the mucus.

If you experience abnormal vaginal bleeding before the 37th week of your pregnancy, it is a cause for concern. Immediately consult with your doctor.

Other symptoms of preterm labor include lower backache, severe abdominal pressure, and mild contractions.

What will your Doctor Look For?

Your doctor may do a quick exam to look for the causes of bleeding during pregnancy. The doctor may do:

  • ● Physical exam
  • ● Blood test
  • ● Ultrasound
  • ● Doppler ultrasound exam

A blood test can show the levels of hCG hormones. A lower level of hCG may indicate a possible miscarriage or an ectopic pregnancy. Higher levels may indicate multiple pregnancies or molar pregnancy.

Ultrasound can show the location and growth of the fetus. A doppler ultrasound scan can show the baby’s heartbeat at even six weeks of pregnancy.

What are the Treatment Options?

Your doctor may closely monitor you and the baby’s health if you experience abnormal vaginal Bleeding during pregnancy. If the bleeding reveals your pregnancy can be harmful, the doctor may prescribe the following medications:

  • ● Methotrexate: will be helpful during an ectopic pregnancy
  • ● Misoprostol: will end a dangerous pregnancy in the first seven weeks

What are the Treatment Options?

Your doctor may closely monitor you and the baby’s health if you experience abnormal vaginal Bleeding during pregnancy. If the bleeding reveals your pregnancy can be harmful, the doctor may prescribe the following medications:

  • ● Methotrexate: will be helpful during an ectopic pregnancy
  • ● Misoprostol: will end a dangerous pregnancy in the first seven weeks

What Are the Result Associated with Bleeding During Pregnancy ?

Bleeding During Pregnancy can be alarming. However, in many cases, slight bleeding during the early stages of pregnancy is quite normal. Excessive bleeding may be a cause for concern. If you have any questions or concerns regarding the bleeding, you must consult with your doctor.

Request an Appointment at Smiles

FAQ's

Can Stress Cause Miscarriage?

Although excessive stress during pregnancy is not good for your overall health, no evidence shows stress can cause Miscarriage.

What is the Color of Miscarriage Blood?

The miscarriage blood can appear brown and may resemble coffee grounds. Sometimes, it may appear bright red or pink. It can alternate between light and heavy bleeding or may temporarily stop before starting again.

How Can you Know the Difference Between Period Blood and Implantation Bleeding?

Implantation bleeding may look slightly pinkish-brown in color. On the other hand, period blood starts with a pink or brown color and later changes to crimson red.

What are the Symptoms of Fetus Implantation?

The common symptoms of Fetus Implantation include sore breasts, cramping, bloating, and slight vaginal bleeding.

Can Bleeding During Pregnancy Affect the Baby?

Yes, there are chances of excessive Bleeding During Pregnancy, affecting the baby.

Patients
Testimonials

View Our Reviews
On Google

View Our Reviews
On Facebook

View Our Reviews
On Practo

View Our Reviews
On JustDial